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Wednesday, June 17th, 2009

Lazy Launch Days Are Numbered

Lazy Launch Days Are Numbered

iStock 000000772236XSmall 150x150 Lazy Launch Days Are NumberedI know your time is valuable so I’ll get right to the point.

Product owners and affiliates for the last couple years have lived a happy co-dependent existence. In the beginning, affiliates had limited choices. Today, it’s an ocean of opportunity.

The reason I’m writing you today is because I feel the industry needs a wake up call.

Here are the problems…

  1. Affiliate marketers are becoming less dependent on product owners
  2. Affiliates have more choices then ever before
  3. Affiliates have evolved with the times but product owners have not
  4. Product owners are relying too heavily on affiliates

Affiliates Don’t Need You Anymore

In the old days, an affiliate could simply link to a product owner and that was enough.

Then over time, more and more affiliate marketers were created by the product owners — so many new affiliates that, in order to start making sales, you had to offer some sort of bonus or incentive that no one else was offering.

Now in 2009, you need to go even further than just bonuses, because almost everyone’s doing bonuses at this point.

To compete with the massive amounts of affiliates, you now have to capture leads from your traffic, offer a bonus, and then point the prospect to the product owner.

Don’t forget that more and more people everyday are learning that they can sign up as an affiliate themselves and buy through their own links.

Affiliates are now generating their own leads, creating their own offers, and then sending the customer to someone else. How long before the affiliate thinks: “If I’m generating the lead and creating the offer, then why am I sending the customer to someone else?”

Basically, to compete in today’s world of affiliate marketing, an affiliate has to do all the same things a product owner normally does.

Most affiliates become affiliates to avoid the responsibilities of a product owner. You must alleviate some of the work your affiliates are having to do or risk losing them or worse gaining them as a competitor!

There’s a Network On Every Corner

Back in the day, Amazon, Clickbank, Linkshare, and a handful of others were the only affiliate networks on the scene. Now you’ve got over 32 “major” affiliate networks, not to mention all the small or start-up networks.

It gets worse, too, because new networks are constantly springing up and these networks are offering much more then the typical product owner.

Inside any one of the 10+ affiliate networks that I’m a part of, I’ve got all kinds of affiliate tools and a dedicated affiliate manager.

The average product launcher just scrapes by with a basic affiliate promotion kit. Banners, emails, keywords, and some links are not enough anymore.

Today, affiliates need brandable videos, landing pages, reports, e-courses, interviews, and articles… The Internet in 2009 is a content beast — your affiliates need content!

If your eyes are opening and you’re seeing the problems, then you should check out what the adult industry is doing for their affiliates.

The adult industry offers their affiliates free hosting, dedicated managers, a plethora of brandable landing pages, even whole membership sites that the affiliate can promote the product owner with.

Independents can beat the big networks by offering more customization, unique tools, and personal touch. If they don’t, then they’ll lose their affiliates. Which actually leads me into the third problem I see happening…

Affiliates evolved and optimized their methods for their product-owning partners. However, the product owners are still offering the same resources they offered 4, 5, and 6 years ago. Not only that, but it seems product owners have gotten greedier and lazier.

Product Owners Should Be Responsible For Conversions

In this last part, I’m going to speak for myself, and if anyone is feeling the same thing they can let me know in the comments.

The other parts I’ve already spoken with many other affiliates so I was comfortable speaking for the majority. This next part could possibly just be a weird fluke I experienced and could be totally alone in it.

But I doubt it! icon wink Lazy Launch Days Are Numbered

Here goes…

Lately, I have been making some showings in the top 10s of different joint-venture leaderboards, which sounds great. However, for most of them my conversions have been almost totally dependent on my offering a bonus.

“Wait,” you’re saying, “you make more sales by offering a bonus to your subscribers who buy through you?” No!

What I’m saying is, if I don’t offer a bonus, then I don’t make sales. I know because I tried it on the last JV leaderboard I got on. I was in the top 10 for leads, and then when it came time for sales, I never offered a bonus.

Sure enough, I got an egg in my sales column as my reward for that test.

In the product launch right before that, I offered a great bonus and came in top five in sales, making several thousand in commissions plus winning a 52″ flat screen TV.

Here’s my problem though…

I could have just emailed my list, charged for my bonus, made the several grand myself, and not shared my customers with the product owner.

If the product owner’s sales funnel requires that the affiliate offers a bonus in order to make sales…

… Then what does the affiliate need the product owner for?

(Read that again.)

I understand there is a “game” to be played, but this is not the ideal situation for affiliates. And as a product owner you want to take care of your affiliates as best you can. For example, I’ll never promote for that guy again.

In my eyes, he charged too much money for his product and the price seemed largely based on knowing his affiliates would offer a much bigger bonus to compensate for it.

Meanwhile, the affiliate is only getting 50% of revenue. Yet the affiliate is motivating the crowd, generating the leads, creating the hot offer, and generating the sale…

… While the product own just created the product!

Creating the product is a big piece of the pie, but what I’m saying over and over again, here, is that, if I have to offer such a great bonus in order for your product to make sales, I might as well just sell my bonus!

More and more of the top affiliates are getting fed up with this.

Lazy launch days are numbered because affiliates are getting sick and tired of the product owners not evolving their methods to keep the affiliates hard work secure.

Here’s a quick solutions list so you can easily identify what you need to be doing to make sure your affiliates are happy.

What You Must Do To Keep Affiliates Happy

  1. You must offer something unique to your affiliates or risk losing them to the networks.
  2. You must provide every resource an affiliate would need to make the sale, including a variety of different bonuses.
  3. The more you update your affiliates tools (e.g., emails, videos, reports, landing pages, etc), then the more they will go out and promote those new tools.
  4. As your affiliates’ job requirements evolve, so should yours as the product owner to make sure the affiliate has what’s needed and is doing what’s required.
  5. Protect your affiliates’ commissions during launches, and make their job as easy as you can — you are the CREATOR, they are the PROMOTER.
  6. Never steal from your affiliates by denying commissions on backend sales, especially during the launch.

I’m not saying I’m the perfect product owner, either, since I’m missing a few of these elements in my affiliate program myself. Although, you can bet I won’t be letting much time go by before I start making sure I have them all.

Thanks for listening to my rant. And please post your comments and tell me what you think of this situation. I’d love to hear them!

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  • http://twitter.com/AndyCatsimanes AndyCatsimanes

    Reading: @JustinBrooke ’s Lazy Launch Days Are Numbered http://bit.ly/2tCiy
    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • http://twitter.com/AndyBeard AndyBeard

    Lazy Launch Days Are Numbered | Marketers Board http://bit.ly/1jx4Th
    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • http://andybeard.eu AndyBeard

    There is another dimension to this

    You send leads that didn’t convert

    The product owner on the next affiliate launch they promote offers your leads that very same product for free, if they buy the other product.

    You as an affiliate earn nothing from that, yet did a share of the work in establishing value for what ended up being offered as a bonus.

    It is quite possible that those same leads might have purchased at a later date, after an extended sales period, maybe a slightly different offer.

    I decided a long time ago that I am not going to waste material that could contribute significantly to the value of products I might launch in the future, just for a product launch bonus.

    I also refuse to promote people now who offer the products I promoted as an affiliate a few days/weeks later as a bonus to another promotion.

    I went into a little bit more depth on it here, and am going to link through as you covered some points I didn’t, as I don’t deal with many of the large CPA networks.
    andybeard.eu/1578/affiliate-product-launches-i-refuse-to-pro...

  • http://andybeard.eu Andy Beard

    There is another dimension to this

    You send leads that didn’t convert

    The product owner on the next affiliate launch they promote offers your leads that very same product for free, if they buy the other product.

    You as an affiliate earn nothing from that, yet did a share of the work in establishing value for what ended up being offered as a bonus.

    It is quite possible that those same leads might have purchased at a later date, after an extended sales period, maybe a slightly different offer.

    I decided a long time ago that I am not going to waste material that could contribute significantly to the value of products I might launch in the future, just for a product launch bonus.

    I also refuse to promote people now who offer the products I promoted as an affiliate a few days/weeks later as a bonus to another promotion.

    I went into a little bit more depth on it here, and am going to link through as you covered some points I didn’t, as I don’t deal with many of the large CPA networks.
    andybeard.eu/1578/affiliate-product-launches-i-refuse-to-pro...

  • http://www.trishjones.com/ Trish Jones

    Real food for thought Justin especially given the fact that most of the gurus will tell you that if you want to make sales, you must either partner with someone or gather an army of affiliates.

    Talk about “stressing out” your list when you keep promoting one offer after another to them. I personally delete those affiliate marketers who never give me any information but send me the next best thing every other day.

    Whilst I agree with you that product owners are lazy, I also think many affiliates are too. They sell based on how much commission they can make rather than how good the product is. This is where I give StomperNet their due … on two occasions, they sent samples of their product – as for the Formula 5, I was just so busy at the time that I didn’t get to promote it but having read just the first portion and putting it into action myself, I would have had something tangible to give my list and, a good reason to buy. Most affilaites don’t have this which is a real shame.

    Trish

  • http://www.trishjones.com Trish Jones

    Real food for thought Justin especially given the fact that most of the gurus will tell you that if you want to make sales, you must either partner with someone or gather an army of affiliates.

    Talk about “stressing out” your list when you keep promoting one offer after another to them. I personally delete those affiliate marketers who never give me any information but send me the next best thing every other day.

    Whilst I agree with you that product owners are lazy, I also think many affiliates are too. They sell based on how much commission they can make rather than how good the product is. This is where I give StomperNet their due … on two occasions, they sent samples of their product – as for the Formula 5, I was just so busy at the time that I didn’t get to promote it but having read just the first portion and putting it into action myself, I would have had something tangible to give my list and, a good reason to buy. Most affilaites don’t have this which is a real shame.

    Trish

  • http://josephratliff.com/blog Joseph Ratliff

    Justin,

    You bring some interesting insights with this article…when I read it, I started thinking to myself (as an affiliate) “Yeah, this hits home”.

    The affiliate game is “professionalizing” itself online (and offline too).
    (I know “professionalizing” isn’t a word, just a description :) )

    In the beginning, affiliate links were all affiliates needed to succeed…then more and more was needed to help the affiliates promote…then “help” changed to “support” the affiliates…and now I wouldn’t be surprised to see affiliates being more selective who they partner with. I also wouldn’t be surprised to see affiliate networks and product owners being more selective which affiliates they allow to promote their products.

    The whole game (business) online is evolving.

    Thanks for the insights Justin. Good stuff as usual.

    Joseph Ratliff

  • http://josephratliff.com/blog Joseph Ratliff

    Justin,

    You bring some interesting insights with this article…when I read it, I started thinking to myself (as an affiliate) “Yeah, this hits home”.

    The affiliate game is “professionalizing” itself online (and offline too).
    (I know “professionalizing” isn’t a word, just a description :) )

    In the beginning, affiliate links were all affiliates needed to succeed…then more and more was needed to help the affiliates promote…then “help” changed to “support” the affiliates…and now I wouldn’t be surprised to see affiliates being more selective who they partner with. I also wouldn’t be surprised to see affiliate networks and product owners being more selective which affiliates they allow to promote their products.

    The whole game (business) online is evolving.

    Thanks for the insights Justin. Good stuff as usual.

    Joseph Ratliff

  • http://twitter.com/justinbrooke justinbrooke

    Wrote a guest blog post for @michelfortin check it out here http://marketersboard.com/lazy-launch-days-numbered (Thx Michel)
    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • http://www.thebadblogger.com/ The Bad Blogger

    Hey Justin, I had just read your interview in this month’s DotCom Secret Journal, and is really inspiring.

    Anyway, is hard to be an affiliate now, since is so competitive, and I mean extremely competitive, I still think creating a unique protect of your own and creating service for others is the best choice.

    As you say in how to make your affiliate happier, is still come down, how much affiliate value you can give them to promote your product, “unique” is the word I can use for the bottom line of all.

  • http://twitter.com/BillHibbler BillHibbler

    Currently Browsing:undefined http://is.gd/14DvP
    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • http://www.thebadblogger.com/ The Bad Blogger

    Hey Justin, I had just read your interview in this month’s DotCom Secret Journal, and is really inspiring.

    Anyway, is hard to be an affiliate now, since is so competitive, and I mean extremely competitive, I still think creating a unique protect of your own and creating service for others is the best choice.

    As you say in how to make your affiliate happier, is still come down, how much affiliate value you can give them to promote your product, “unique” is the word I can use for the bottom line of all.

  • http://InternetBusinessKing.com/ David King

    Interesting… More work for Less pay…. that wasn’t the original reason I got into IM. LoL

    I agree though…

    I actually got a skype message today that was from someone trying to tell me to promote their product, I never talked to them in my life and they just wanted me to promote their products for the money that i could potentially make…. I was turned off b/c i don’t know the quality of the product b/c i haven’t seen it and this person has never talked to me before…. Whatever happend to build a relationship then work together? ohh well… I won’t be promoting for him anyway!

    I think that a big part of future Jv’s will depend on the relationship between the creator and affiliate and if the product is actually quality content and worth the price.

    Crappy marketers with crappy products will be gone like the wind… they will continue to lose business to the people who deliver higher quality products and have the quality relationships and don’t push their product on all the affiliate partners.

    The web is definitely changing! Gotta change with it or you’ll be left behind!

  • http://InternetBusinessKing.com David King

    Interesting… More work for Less pay…. that wasn’t the original reason I got into IM. LoL

    I agree though…

    I actually got a skype message today that was from someone trying to tell me to promote their product, I never talked to them in my life and they just wanted me to promote their products for the money that i could potentially make…. I was turned off b/c i don’t know the quality of the product b/c i haven’t seen it and this person has never talked to me before…. Whatever happend to build a relationship then work together? ohh well… I won’t be promoting for him anyway!

    I think that a big part of future Jv’s will depend on the relationship between the creator and affiliate and if the product is actually quality content and worth the price.

    Crappy marketers with crappy products will be gone like the wind… they will continue to lose business to the people who deliver higher quality products and have the quality relationships and don’t push their product on all the affiliate partners.

    The web is definitely changing! Gotta change with it or you’ll be left behind!

  • http://www.allonaudiobooks.com/ Jerry Waxman

    Interesting article, Justin. I didn’t know that affiliates were offering incentives. When I take the time to develop my own product, I sell it, or try to.

    I agree that a good product owner provides lots of resources and tools. But if they provided extra bonuses for affiliates to offer, it seems like it’s self defeating. All the affiliates will be offering the same bonus. On the other hand, if you only make sales to your list when you offer a bonus, then I guess the product owner should supply it.

    Thanks

  • http://twitter.com/ByYourSite ByYourSite

    Reading: @JustinBrooke Lazy Launch Days Are Numbered http://bit.ly/CmMgF or why product owners should take care of affilates
    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • http://www.allonaudiobooks.com Jerry Waxman

    Interesting article, Justin. I didn’t know that affiliates were offering incentives. When I take the time to develop my own product, I sell it, or try to.

    I agree that a good product owner provides lots of resources and tools. But if they provided extra bonuses for affiliates to offer, it seems like it’s self defeating. All the affiliates will be offering the same bonus. On the other hand, if you only make sales to your list when you offer a bonus, then I guess the product owner should supply it.

    Thanks

  • http://AffiliateBlackBook.com/ X

    Great article Justin and I couldn’t agree more.

    “The Great Affiliate Marketing Sham” is coming to an end as more and more affiliate’s wise up and realize they can use these launches as a means of leverage to build their own business, and not someone else’s.

    Affiliates (willing to do a little work) have a lot of power in the equation. And the balance of power has already started to shift.

  • http://AffiliateBlackBook.com X

    Great article Justin and I couldn’t agree more.

    “The Great Affiliate Marketing Sham” is coming to an end as more and more affiliate’s wise up and realize they can use these launches as a means of leverage to build their own business, and not someone else’s.

    Affiliates (willing to do a little work) have a lot of power in the equation. And the balance of power has already started to shift.

  • http://nichevictory.com/ Nick Brighton

    Hi Justin,

    I totally agree, but this is just another sign of how such a ferocious industry is having to evolve due to competition and consumer choice.

    The best affiliates will always be the ones you know by name, and approach personally with a proposal, or JVs who have a vested interest in promoting your products.

    Mass affiliate “fishing” may bring on board more affiliates, but at what cost? In reality, attracting mass affiliates and hoping/trying to get 20 + of them to perform well for you is optimistic, especially considering their standardized expectations to have everything done for them short of getting traffic.

    It seems to me that in the more cut throat environments such as the adult and IM markets, the key is to provide a product that is truly unique and pays a hefty commission…

    …otherwise all you are doing is farming traffic brokers, who call themselves affiliates. And when it reaches that point, those people sending you traffic are only concerned with how the numbers stack up.

    And that means you’re losing loyalty easily…because these folks have no personal interest in promoting for you.

    In short, a clear way to combat this entire issue is:

    1. Hand pick your partners and work closely with them, providing unique solutions that meet their specific requirements

    2. Develop your relationships with your affiliates

    3. Create a product that affiliates drool over to promote

    And one final point is this:

    If you can’t create and run a business that isn’t easily copied or dropped by affiliates, then how strong, useful, unique, valuable and worthwhile is your business or your products in the first place?

    Food for thought indeed.

  • http://www.thelazymarketer.com/ Chris Rempel

    I agree that for launches involving a launch sequence, mailouts and so on, this is true.

    For evergreen products, what it comes down to is visitor value for the affiliate, which is dependant on:

    1. Conversion

    2. Average Customer Value (backend offers, high-ticket, etc. so you can afford to have the front end offers self-liquidate for affiliates or ad spend)

    3. Actual Product Value (quality)

    If you can consistently provide the best possible conversion, the highest overall client value (some of which is largely commissionable to the affs) and the highest quality in your market – it will simply be a matter of time until you have the controlling affiliate market share in your industry.

    This assuming that you are actively recruiting and reaching affiliates (even though the heavy hitters will usually find you themselves).

    Obviously the more resources you provide, the better – but it’s all for nothing unless those three variables are firmly established to begin with.

    As an active affiliate a decent number markets, I’ve found that sometimes the aff programs with “tons” of resources just don’t convert. While other products, with very little in the way of resources, convert like crazy.

    Now that’s the exception and NOT the rule – but from the affiliate’s perspective, it always comes down to the money. Yes, content and resources are great – but if their visitors are worth more by promoting something else (even if the other guy offers ZERO resources), they will go to where the money is.

    In other words, before you build an elaborate “chariot” of affiliate resources – make sure you’ve got a horse that can run it all :-)

    Cheers

    -Chris

  • http://nichevictory.com Nick Brighton

    Hi Justin,

    I totally agree, but this is just another sign of how such a ferocious industry is having to evolve due to competition and consumer choice.

    The best affiliates will always be the ones you know by name, and approach personally with a proposal, or JVs who have a vested interest in promoting your products.

    Mass affiliate “fishing” may bring on board more affiliates, but at what cost? In reality, attracting mass affiliates and hoping/trying to get 20 + of them to perform well for you is optimistic, especially considering their standardized expectations to have everything done for them short of getting traffic.

    It seems to me that in the more cut throat environments such as the adult and IM markets, the key is to provide a product that is truly unique and pays a hefty commission…

    …otherwise all you are doing is farming traffic brokers, who call themselves affiliates. And when it reaches that point, those people sending you traffic are only concerned with how the numbers stack up.

    And that means you’re losing loyalty easily…because these folks have no personal interest in promoting for you.

    In short, a clear way to combat this entire issue is:

    1. Hand pick your partners and work closely with them, providing unique solutions that meet their specific requirements

    2. Develop your relationships with your affiliates

    3. Create a product that affiliates drool over to promote

    And one final point is this:

    If you can’t create and run a business that isn’t easily copied or dropped by affiliates, then how strong, useful, unique, valuable and worthwhile is your business or your products in the first place?

    Food for thought indeed.

  • http://www.thelazymarketer.com Chris Rempel

    I agree that for launches involving a launch sequence, mailouts and so on, this is true.

    For evergreen products, what it comes down to is visitor value for the affiliate, which is dependant on:

    1. Conversion

    2. Average Customer Value (backend offers, high-ticket, etc. so you can afford to have the front end offers self-liquidate for affiliates or ad spend)

    3. Actual Product Value (quality)

    If you can consistently provide the best possible conversion, the highest overall client value (some of which is largely commissionable to the affs) and the highest quality in your market – it will simply be a matter of time until you have the controlling affiliate market share in your industry.

    This assuming that you are actively recruiting and reaching affiliates (even though the heavy hitters will usually find you themselves).

    Obviously the more resources you provide, the better – but it’s all for nothing unless those three variables are firmly established to begin with.

    As an active affiliate a decent number markets, I’ve found that sometimes the aff programs with “tons” of resources just don’t convert. While other products, with very little in the way of resources, convert like crazy.

    Now that’s the exception and NOT the rule – but from the affiliate’s perspective, it always comes down to the money. Yes, content and resources are great – but if their visitors are worth more by promoting something else (even if the other guy offers ZERO resources), they will go to where the money is.

    In other words, before you build an elaborate “chariot” of affiliate resources – make sure you’ve got a horse that can run it all :-)

    Cheers

    -Chris

  • http://www.sitefling.com/ Justin Brooke

    Well said Chris, BTW my subscribers tell me you have some killer stuff going on. Conversions should absolutely be the foremost concern for the product owner before asking their first affiliate to promote.

  • http://www.sitefling.com Justin Brooke

    Well said Chris, BTW my subscribers tell me you have some killer stuff going on. Conversions should absolutely be the foremost concern for the product owner before asking their first affiliate to promote.

  • http://WhiteHatCrew.com/ Antone Roundy

    @Andy Beard – one thing I’m doing with a few of my products (and will do with more when I get around to it) is tracking the ID of the affiliate who sent them to me in my autoresponder. Then I insert their ID in any links I email to those prospects later so that the original affiliate will get credit for future sales. This solves the problem you mention and also the problem of customres deleting an affiliate’s cookie before it was set to expire.

  • http://WhiteHatCrew.com/ Antone Roundy

    @Andy Beard – one thing I’m doing with a few of my products (and will do with more when I get around to it) is tracking the ID of the affiliate who sent them to me in my autoresponder. Then I insert their ID in any links I email to those prospects later so that the original affiliate will get credit for future sales. This solves the problem you mention and also the problem of customres deleting an affiliate’s cookie before it was set to expire.

  • http://twitter.com/lynnterry lynnterry

    Reading Lazy Launch Days Are Numbered http://marketersboard.com/lazy-launch-days-numbered/ by @justinbrooke
    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • http://twitter.com/lexirodrigo lexirodrigo

    A good read RT @lynnterry: Reading Lazy Launch Days Are Numbered http://marketersboard.com/lazy-launch-days-numbered/ by @justinbrooke
    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • http://twitter.com/DJ_Sylvester DJ_Sylvester

    Go read this post by @justinbrooke on affiliate marketing “What You Must Do To Keep Affiliates Happy” http://tr.im/oQ3T
    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • Susi Gilbert

    I’m too new in Affiliate Marketing to even realize some of the above mentioned things are happening, but as a perplexed customer, I have lots of thoughts…..

    WHY am I being bombarded w/ a gazillion bonuses for each product? Isn’t the product itself “Good Enough” for me to fork over my $47-$1997?

    I’m so far behind in reading/watching/implementing the Original Content from the Product Owner, that I have no clue when I’ll get around to digesting the Bonus Content.

    And PUH-LEEZE! Stop w/ the One-Time-Offers! I KNOW they’re an industry standard, I know McDonald’s does it w/ their fries, and Walmart does it w/ their checkout aisles filled w/ more stuff for me to remember to buy, but so far, not too many mass merchants try to stop me AFTER I’VE PAID to try to sell me ONE MORE THING, BETTER THAN WHAT’s Already in my Cart!

    DANG!!!! If it’s THAT good, why wasn’t it offered to me in the beginning? If it’s a Must Have, why am I just now hearing about it?

    I may well have to eat my words in the future if I ever become a Product Owner & want to get that extra 20-40% more sales. lol! I just hope that by then, I could create a buying opportunity for the customer UP FRONT, to tell them, “I’ve created 2-3-4 Excellent Courses. Each one Builds on The Next. Each is Also Informative Enough to Be Used By Itself. You will definitetly succeed if you Choose Just One Product, and IMPLEMENT it’s information. But to get the best overall education, you should get all the products. At the end of this page, You can choose from 4 Buying Options. This is your ONLY chance to get these items, there will be NO OTO later on”……..

    Or, as a person would do in a real store “Take a look at my product descriptions below, choose the one or several you like, and I’ll be happy to meet you at the checkout counter.”

    Neither Wal-Mart or Neiman’s Sales Clerks chase me out of the store, saying, “But Wait, Buy One More Thing!”, AFTER I’ve already made my purchase! “You bought that ice-chest/mink coat, but wait, there’s a new and improved one we just found!” Puh-Leeze!

    Back to Bonuses…. Do you Product Owners/Super Affiliates have any idea how intimidating those are to the beginner? Maybe it’s the name of the competitive game, but at the moment, I have just about NOTHING to offer my yet-to-be-created-list as an incentive to buy from me. Perhaps those “bonuses” will appear “by magic”/be created by me/ will be a worked out deal w/ a future JV, but at the moment, they don’t exist in my beginner’s arsenal.

    After this rant, I’d be leery of offering them! lol!

    As a beginner, I AM appreciative of the extra efforts I’ve discovered a few Product Owners now make, re the better/individualized landing pages, the better options for sales copy, etc. But as a future Product Owner (if I become one), that stuff also scares me! Having to create it! Maybe by that time I’ll be successful enough to hire it done, which I guess is how those extra landing pages are done.

    Nothing ever stays the same, does it?

    Thanks for the informative article.

    Susi.

  • Susi Gilbert

    I’m too new in Affiliate Marketing to even realize some of the above mentioned things are happening, but as a perplexed customer, I have lots of thoughts…..

    WHY am I being bombarded w/ a gazillion bonuses for each product? Isn’t the product itself “Good Enough” for me to fork over my $47-$1997?

    I’m so far behind in reading/watching/implementing the Original Content from the Product Owner, that I have no clue when I’ll get around to digesting the Bonus Content.

    And PUH-LEEZE! Stop w/ the One-Time-Offers! I KNOW they’re an industry standard, I know McDonald’s does it w/ their fries, and Walmart does it w/ their checkout aisles filled w/ more stuff for me to remember to buy, but so far, not too many mass merchants try to stop me AFTER I’VE PAID to try to sell me ONE MORE THING, BETTER THAN WHAT’s Already in my Cart!

    DANG!!!! If it’s THAT good, why wasn’t it offered to me in the beginning? If it’s a Must Have, why am I just now hearing about it?

    I may well have to eat my words in the future if I ever become a Product Owner & want to get that extra 20-40% more sales. lol! I just hope that by then, I could create a buying opportunity for the customer UP FRONT, to tell them, “I’ve created 2-3-4 Excellent Courses. Each one Builds on The Next. Each is Also Informative Enough to Be Used By Itself. You will definitetly succeed if you Choose Just One Product, and IMPLEMENT it’s information. But to get the best overall education, you should get all the products. At the end of this page, You can choose from 4 Buying Options. This is your ONLY chance to get these items, there will be NO OTO later on”……..

    Or, as a person would do in a real store “Take a look at my product descriptions below, choose the one or several you like, and I’ll be happy to meet you at the checkout counter.”

    Neither Wal-Mart or Neiman’s Sales Clerks chase me out of the store, saying, “But Wait, Buy One More Thing!”, AFTER I’ve already made my purchase! “You bought that ice-chest/mink coat, but wait, there’s a new and improved one we just found!” Puh-Leeze!

    Back to Bonuses…. Do you Product Owners/Super Affiliates have any idea how intimidating those are to the beginner? Maybe it’s the name of the competitive game, but at the moment, I have just about NOTHING to offer my yet-to-be-created-list as an incentive to buy from me. Perhaps those “bonuses” will appear “by magic”/be created by me/ will be a worked out deal w/ a future JV, but at the moment, they don’t exist in my beginner’s arsenal.

    After this rant, I’d be leery of offering them! lol!

    As a beginner, I AM appreciative of the extra efforts I’ve discovered a few Product Owners now make, re the better/individualized landing pages, the better options for sales copy, etc. But as a future Product Owner (if I become one), that stuff also scares me! Having to create it! Maybe by that time I’ll be successful enough to hire it done, which I guess is how those extra landing pages are done.

    Nothing ever stays the same, does it?

    Thanks for the informative article.

    Susi.

  • http://andybeard.eu AndyBeard

    @Antone Roundy

    Not really…. at least not with many marketers

    Whilst they might claim that they mail using your affiliate link, that doesn’t help if they give the products away as bonuses for something else.

    A $5000 bonus in pretty real value (as in products people really were buying for that recently) for a $2000 sale seems to be becoming common.

    There are very few marketers who can put together a $5000 bonus package without including some, or all of their premium products.

    Any that are not tempted but sign up anyway to another list a few months later will be offered that 2nd product as a bonus for the original product… as long as they clear cookies.

    The person who originally provided the lead, and even presold the first product in many cases doesn’t matter.

    I have other pet gripes… 10+ affiliate links in the free material leading up to a launch, horrible viral inviters asking for passwords, retweet scripts that are a “leak” etc

  • http://andybeard.eu/ Andy Beard

    @Antone Roundy

    Not really…. at least not with many marketers

    Whilst they might claim that they mail using your affiliate link, that doesn’t help if they give the products away as bonuses for something else.

    A $5000 bonus in pretty real value (as in products people really were buying for that recently) for a $2000 sale seems to be becoming common.

    There are very few marketers who can put together a $5000 bonus package without including some, or all of their premium products.

    Any that are not tempted but sign up anyway to another list a few months later will be offered that 2nd product as a bonus for the original product… as long as they clear cookies.

    The person who originally provided the lead, and even presold the first product in many cases doesn’t matter.

    I have other pet gripes… 10+ affiliate links in the free material leading up to a launch, horrible viral inviters asking for passwords, retweet scripts that are a “leak” etc

  • http://Mankind2.com/ Glen B. Stewart

    Justin – Michael – Silvie ~

    Yet another hard-hitting, poignant success sculpting Exposé.

    I believe getting to the point where I should schedule a phone call and a personal thank you.

    Your post was both very timely, and of the perfect focus for precisely what one needs to take place before during and after any product launch.

    Great job team…

    – Glen

    Glen B. Stewart
    Zero Gravity 4 You LLC

  • http://Mankind2.com/ Glen B. Stewart

    Justin – Michael – Silvie ~

    Yet another hard-hitting, poignant success sculpting Exposé.

    I believe getting to the point where I should schedule a phone call and a personal thank you.

    Your post was both very timely, and of the perfect focus for precisely what one needs to take place before during and after any product launch.

    Great job team…

    – Glen

    Glen B. Stewart
    Zero Gravity 4 You LLC

  • http://twitter.com/Affiliate_News1 Affiliate_News1

    NEWS: Lazy Launch Days Are Numbered | Marketers Board http://bit.ly/19mQQX
    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • http://blogwam.com/ Clive

    Another factor that established vendors, especially at Clickbank, overlook is that savvy affiliates are wary of promoting a product via a sales page where, immediately, a drop-down ‘sign up for a free course’ or similar pop-up appears!

    Am I alone in suspecting that many of any future sales generated via the follow-up auto-responder campaign will not be credited to me? ( @Antone Roundy who commented above – you are obviously an exception and more power to you!)

    Why not offer affilates a page without the ‘pop-up’? Or convince me that my ‘cookie’ is still enabled once the auto-responder sequence kicks in. Better still let me have the auto-responder sequence to promote via MY Aweber account.

    I’m more likely to promote you that’s for sure.

  • http://blogwam.com Clive

    Another factor that established vendors, especially at Clickbank, overlook is that savvy affiliates are wary of promoting a product via a sales page where, immediately, a drop-down ‘sign up for a free course’ or similar pop-up appears!

    Am I alone in suspecting that many of any future sales generated via the follow-up auto-responder campaign will not be credited to me? ( @Antone Roundy who commented above – you are obviously an exception and more power to you!)

    Why not offer affilates a page without the ‘pop-up’? Or convince me that my ‘cookie’ is still enabled once the auto-responder sequence kicks in. Better still let me have the auto-responder sequence to promote via MY Aweber account.

    I’m more likely to promote you that’s for sure.

  • http://twitter.com/GregMeares GregMeares

    http://bit.ly/27sFHD
    Interesting reading for affiliate marketers
    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • http://www.sitefling.com/ Justin Brooke

    Hey Clive,

    The “pop-ups” are a way for the product owner to build his list and follow up with the visitor. The more the product owner is able to follow up with the visitor the higher chance you have of making a sale in the 30 day time period that most cookies last.

    Now i’m sure there are some non-reputable marketers using their list to bypass their affiliates by knocking out the affiliates cookie but that would catch on pretty quickly. As an affiliate I prefer they have those opt-in forms and that they are following up trying to make sale past the initial visit.

  • http://www.sitefling.com Justin Brooke

    Hey Clive,

    The “pop-ups” are a way for the product owner to build his list and follow up with the visitor. The more the product owner is able to follow up with the visitor the higher chance you have of making a sale in the 30 day time period that most cookies last.

    Now i’m sure there are some non-reputable marketers using their list to bypass their affiliates by knocking out the affiliates cookie but that would catch on pretty quickly. As an affiliate I prefer they have those opt-in forms and that they are following up trying to make sale past the initial visit.

  • http://www.affiliate-software-review.com/ Peter Koning

    I’m walking away from marketers who simply scrape your list or even worse… they promise to hard code the affiliate id during prelaunch but then somehow “forget” to include our affiliate id during their emails back out to the list – a list built by affiliates.

    Bonuses make sense if it’s something that truly complements the offer and you’ve reviewed the product to know what a good bonus would be.

    Cheers.

  • http://www.affiliate-software-review.com Peter Koning

    I’m walking away from marketers who simply scrape your list or even worse… they promise to hard code the affiliate id during prelaunch but then somehow “forget” to include our affiliate id during their emails back out to the list – a list built by affiliates.

    Bonuses make sense if it’s something that truly complements the offer and you’ve reviewed the product to know what a good bonus would be.

    Cheers.

  • http://twitter.com/randylewiskemp randylewiskemp

    I read a blog entry where Affiliates Don’t Need You Anymore at http://tinyurl.com/mgftz6
    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • http://twitter.com/KyleTully KyleTully

    Reading “lazy launch days are numbered” (A wakeup call for product owners) http://marketersboard.com/lazy-launch-days-numbered/
    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • Pingback: Lazy Launch Days Are Numbered | Marketers Board | Money 4 Burn

  • http://twitter.com/JVBusiness JVBusiness

    Lazy Launch Days Are Numbered | Marketers Board: I also wouldn’t be surprised to see affiliate networks and .. http://bit.ly/TBs1R
    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • http://www.needmoney.com/ Mogul

    As usual, the pornlords get there first.

  • http://www.needmoney.com/ Mogul

    As usual, the pornlords get there first.

  • http://www.jasonberkes.net/ Jason Berkes

    Justin – Your everywhere dude!!! What a great post. Your information is always great.

    Thanks

    Jason Berkes

  • http://www.jasonberkes.net Jason Berkes

    Justin – Your everywhere dude!!! What a great post. Your information is always great.

    Thanks

    Jason Berkes

  • http://wwww.DirectMarketResults.com/ John Deck

    Over the last year I have left a couple of comments around wondering if affiliate program and big launches were heading for a crash.

    1. How do you feel about paying good money for a program and have it given away as a bonus for the next big launch?
    2. It encourages bonus shopping.
    3. Helps build someone else’s list.
    4. In some cases the bonus looks to be a better value then the program being sold.
    5. Each big launch seem to require bigger and bigger bosuses.

    Not sure where it is all heading.

    John Deck

  • http://wwww.DirectMarketResults.com John Deck

    Over the last year I have left a couple of comments around wondering if affiliate program and big launches were heading for a crash.

    1. How do you feel about paying good money for a program and have it given away as a bonus for the next big launch?
    2. It encourages bonus shopping.
    3. Helps build someone else’s list.
    4. In some cases the bonus looks to be a better value then the program being sold.
    5. Each big launch seem to require bigger and bigger bosuses.

    Not sure where it is all heading.

    John Deck

  • http://www.thefilipinoentrepreneur.com/ Lito|TheFilipinoEntrepreneur.C

    Good point Justin. Affiliates have many options today and not in the mercy of product owners.

  • http://www.thefilipinoentrepreneur.com Lito|TheFilipinoEntrepreneur.Com

    Good point Justin. Affiliates have many options today and not in the mercy of product owners.

  • http://www.internetmarketingspeed.com/ James Schramko

    Affiliates can increase control dramatically by creating unique bonuses.

    Concept 1: Offer a bonus for buyers. This way you capture all the buyers details in a qualified list. You can market to that list for the next launch.

    Concept 2: Have your bonus included inside the launch members area for the ‘shock and awe’ part of the launch. I recently did this for a big launch and built a huge list of qualified targeted buyers.

    My big idea is this:

    … affiliates should be product owners if they want to control the game

    Regards

    James

  • http://www.internetmarketingspeed.com James Schramko

    Affiliates can increase control dramatically by creating unique bonuses.

    Concept 1: Offer a bonus for buyers. This way you capture all the buyers details in a qualified list. You can market to that list for the next launch.

    Concept 2: Have your bonus included inside the launch members area for the ‘shock and awe’ part of the launch. I recently did this for a big launch and built a huge list of qualified targeted buyers.

    My big idea is this:

    … affiliates should be product owners if they want to control the game

    Regards

    James

  • http://buildingfromnothing.com/ Anna

    Okay, well – Lets say Joe, Bob and Pete Offer me Product X.

    I ignore Joe’s and Bob’s emails. But when I see Pete promoting it, I get interested. Why? Because I have followed Pete’s blog, read some of Pete’s free eBooks, and Pete even helped me once on a forum. Pete gave me useful information and seems like a level-headed guy so I trust him.

    So I look into Product X and I decide to buy it.

    Then I remember that Joe and Bob wrote about it. I check their emails to see what they have to say.

    Joe, who I never heard of till last week, is offering a big bonus that I can’t resist. I was going to buy it one day for $200 but now I can get it for free. So, I end up buying through Joe’s link. Even though I wanted to buy it through Pete.

    Truthfully, Pete earned the sale. In my opinion.

    So, maybe affiliates shouldn’t be allowed by product owners to offer bonuses?

    Although personally I can attest that there have been times I would never have bought something or tried it, if it weren’t for the bonus. And I wound up keeping it.

    Which makes me wonder if affiliates should all have their own bonuses … making them a combination of affiliate and product owner.

    Then you run into a scenario where a person doesn’t buy a person’s product because they are wondering if it might be offered up for free one day as a bonus.

    Food for thought is right.

  • http://buildingfromnothing.com Anna

    Okay, well – Lets say Joe, Bob and Pete Offer me Product X.

    I ignore Joe’s and Bob’s emails. But when I see Pete promoting it, I get interested. Why? Because I have followed Pete’s blog, read some of Pete’s free eBooks, and Pete even helped me once on a forum. Pete gave me useful information and seems like a level-headed guy so I trust him.

    So I look into Product X and I decide to buy it.

    Then I remember that Joe and Bob wrote about it. I check their emails to see what they have to say.

    Joe, who I never heard of till last week, is offering a big bonus that I can’t resist. I was going to buy it one day for $200 but now I can get it for free. So, I end up buying through Joe’s link. Even though I wanted to buy it through Pete.

    Truthfully, Pete earned the sale. In my opinion.

    So, maybe affiliates shouldn’t be allowed by product owners to offer bonuses?

    Although personally I can attest that there have been times I would never have bought something or tried it, if it weren’t for the bonus. And I wound up keeping it.

    Which makes me wonder if affiliates should all have their own bonuses … making them a combination of affiliate and product owner.

    Then you run into a scenario where a person doesn’t buy a person’s product because they are wondering if it might be offered up for free one day as a bonus.

    Food for thought is right.

  • http://www.MoneyPowerWisdom.com/ Dr.Mani

    Nice post. Got me thinking :)

    The line between ‘joint ventures’ and ‘affiliates’ has been blurred in the Internet marketing niche for a long time now.

    What many call ‘JV’ deals are often little more than affiliate joint promotions.

    Which, in context of what you’ve just highlighted (and most product owners have known intuitively for many years now), makes me wonder: why not merge the two concepts into something more valuable, intimate and hands-on?

    In other words, as a product owner, work with ONLY a close ‘inner circle’ of affiliates/JV partners.

    Keep your product promos exclusive to this small group. Give them extra perks and special, customized promo tools to use, like interviews/webinars with them, co-authored special reports, virtual workshops done together. Maybe even ‘reciprocal promotions’ to your own database.

    The bit that often gets overlooked by many product owners is that, in the headlong rush for ‘quick’ profits, they ignore the real goldmine of a satisfied, even delighted, loyal client base. With one of those, you don’t need too many ‘new’ clients to keep the profit pump primed.

    Years ago, I scaled down on ‘external’ or ‘outbound’ marketing, and in the process, cut down on my own affiliate recruiting efforts BEFORE the ‘bonus war’ reality hit the marketplace. In this way, I have been insulated against the madness and mayhem, while my business chugs along – maybe not expanding massively, but definitely thriving.

    Periodic inflows of new clients come from joint venture co-promotions – and with a good system of delivering value to clients, you don’t need too many of these deals to keep things going well.

    But what’s a beginner to do?

    Use this reality of ‘affiliate bonus wars’ to deliver a killer FRONT-END product – and forego all profits, over-deliver to affiliates, and build intimate relationships with the best performing partners.

    All of this would be done with a view to developing and growing a client-base that will be delighted with the quality of your product or service to the point they’ll be repeat buyers… and at the same time nurturing relationships based on real benefits and value-delivery with your affiliates (who will later morph into that exclusive group of ‘JV partners’).

    Done right, this strategy will simply bypass the need to ‘go back to the well’ too often, and lets you siphon off a segment from your broader marketplace to focus on, deliver value to, and mine for continuing value for years to come – maybe forever!

    In a nutshell, for a product owner, a strategy build entirely on getting more affiliates to sell more products for you is one that condemns you to either working harder than ever, and/or accepting diminishing returns for this effort.

    Build a team that works together. Create a client base that you can help by providing value. And use affiliates ethically to reach that point – by over-delivering to them, too.

    Just my 2 cents!

    All success
    Dr.Mani

  • http://www.MoneyPowerWisdom.com Dr.Mani

    Nice post. Got me thinking :)

    The line between ‘joint ventures’ and ‘affiliates’ has been blurred in the Internet marketing niche for a long time now.

    What many call ‘JV’ deals are often little more than affiliate joint promotions.

    Which, in context of what you’ve just highlighted (and most product owners have known intuitively for many years now), makes me wonder: why not merge the two concepts into something more valuable, intimate and hands-on?

    In other words, as a product owner, work with ONLY a close ‘inner circle’ of affiliates/JV partners.

    Keep your product promos exclusive to this small group. Give them extra perks and special, customized promo tools to use, like interviews/webinars with them, co-authored special reports, virtual workshops done together. Maybe even ‘reciprocal promotions’ to your own database.

    The bit that often gets overlooked by many product owners is that, in the headlong rush for ‘quick’ profits, they ignore the real goldmine of a satisfied, even delighted, loyal client base. With one of those, you don’t need too many ‘new’ clients to keep the profit pump primed.

    Years ago, I scaled down on ‘external’ or ‘outbound’ marketing, and in the process, cut down on my own affiliate recruiting efforts BEFORE the ‘bonus war’ reality hit the marketplace. In this way, I have been insulated against the madness and mayhem, while my business chugs along – maybe not expanding massively, but definitely thriving.

    Periodic inflows of new clients come from joint venture co-promotions – and with a good system of delivering value to clients, you don’t need too many of these deals to keep things going well.

    But what’s a beginner to do?

    Use this reality of ‘affiliate bonus wars’ to deliver a killer FRONT-END product – and forego all profits, over-deliver to affiliates, and build intimate relationships with the best performing partners.

    All of this would be done with a view to developing and growing a client-base that will be delighted with the quality of your product or service to the point they’ll be repeat buyers… and at the same time nurturing relationships based on real benefits and value-delivery with your affiliates (who will later morph into that exclusive group of ‘JV partners’).

    Done right, this strategy will simply bypass the need to ‘go back to the well’ too often, and lets you siphon off a segment from your broader marketplace to focus on, deliver value to, and mine for continuing value for years to come – maybe forever!

    In a nutshell, for a product owner, a strategy build entirely on getting more affiliates to sell more products for you is one that condemns you to either working harder than ever, and/or accepting diminishing returns for this effort.

    Build a team that works together. Create a client base that you can help by providing value. And use affiliates ethically to reach that point – by over-delivering to them, too.

    Just my 2 cents!

    All success
    Dr.Mani

  • http://twitter.com/drmani drmani

    Well worth a read (for affiliates and product owners) by @justinbrooke http://marketersboard.com/lazy-launch-days-numbered/
    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • http://twitter.com/keithgoodrum keithgoodrum

    Reading @justinbrooke “Lazy Launch Days Are Numbered” post on @michelfortin blog http://bit.ly/13cNdQ
    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • http://www.internetmarketingspeed.com/ James Schramko

    @Anna

    The market decides!!! Why couldnt Pete make a bonus anyway?

  • http://www.internetmarketingspeed.com James Schramko

    @Anna

    The market decides!!! Why couldnt Pete make a bonus anyway?

  • http://www.sitefling.com/ Justin Brooke

    @Dr.Mani – I’ve seen authors doing the virtual summits and teleseminars with their promoters. In fact I just did that with Dave Lakhani for his latest book.

    A “rolling” launch with one new big affiliate per week and that strategy could be the best for all three parties. The affiliate, the product owner, and the customers.

  • http://www.sitefling.com Justin Brooke

    @Dr.Mani – I’ve seen authors doing the virtual summits and teleseminars with their promoters. In fact I just did that with Dave Lakhani for his latest book.

    A “rolling” launch with one new big affiliate per week and that strategy could be the best for all three parties. The affiliate, the product owner, and the customers.

  • http://www.ThinkWriteRetire.com/ Dr.Mani

    Maybe I thought of this idea because I’m right in the middle of promoting my first print book!

    :)

    All success
    Dr.Mani
    Author: ‘Think, Write and Retire’
    http://www.ThinkWriteRetire.com

  • http://www.ThinkWriteRetire.com Dr.Mani

    Maybe I thought of this idea because I’m right in the middle of promoting my first print book!

    :)

    All success
    Dr.Mani
    Author: ‘Think, Write and Retire’
    http://www.ThinkWriteRetire.com

  • http://buildingfromnothing.com/ Anna

    @James – I think you’re right. Pete really should make a bonus if everyone else is … but then that takes us back around to the “why not just sell the bonus” question.

    Maybe a different bonus with every launch, which was never sold formerly, but never repeated again for free? Of course that’s a lot of work so the person would have to have a big following to make it worthwhile. But at least that would avoid some of the other potential problems which are mentioned in this post and comments.

    Affiliates wouldn’t be promoting a paid product, only to have it be given away later as a bonus. And people wouldn’t avoid buying something “in case in becomes a bonus later” if it were offered free only once and after that it were for sale.

    Just means people will have to come up with a lot of great ideas for products, which gets tricky when so many people are in info-overload as it is. Get’s interesting at least!

  • http://buildingfromnothing.com Anna

    @James – I think you’re right. Pete really should make a bonus if everyone else is … but then that takes us back around to the “why not just sell the bonus” question.

    Maybe a different bonus with every launch, which was never sold formerly, but never repeated again for free? Of course that’s a lot of work so the person would have to have a big following to make it worthwhile. But at least that would avoid some of the other potential problems which are mentioned in this post and comments.

    Affiliates wouldn’t be promoting a paid product, only to have it be given away later as a bonus. And people wouldn’t avoid buying something “in case in becomes a bonus later” if it were offered free only once and after that it were for sale.

    Just means people will have to come up with a lot of great ideas for products, which gets tricky when so many people are in info-overload as it is. Get’s interesting at least!

  • http://www.thefallofwork.com/ Joseph B.

    WOW, touchy subject :)

    Just my two cents…

    Are your products really worth much if you give them away on every launch?

    This is a terrible cycle because product owners have to charge more to get the affiliates to offer sweet bonuses. Don’t believe for a second that you aren’t somehow paying for that bonus.

    I buy your product this lauch then next launch you give your product away as a bonus! Why did I even pay?

    I agree with Trish, Stomper does it right “most of the time”

    One of the biggest and most insidious problems is thier hurting (and targeting) mostly newbies

    There is affiliate incest going on too (remember the big guru video explaining how to clear your cookies in great detail) why should I even bother trying to promote you with that kind of #$%& going on

    Lastly but not leastly, (made that last word up), YOU DON”T NEED HALF THIS CRAP!

    P.S. What ever happened to building “quality websites?”

  • http://www.thefallofwork.com Joseph B.

    WOW, touchy subject :)

    Just my two cents…

    Are your products really worth much if you give them away on every launch?

    This is a terrible cycle because product owners have to charge more to get the affiliates to offer sweet bonuses. Don’t believe for a second that you aren’t somehow paying for that bonus.

    I buy your product this lauch then next launch you give your product away as a bonus! Why did I even pay?

    I agree with Trish, Stomper does it right “most of the time”

    One of the biggest and most insidious problems is thier hurting (and targeting) mostly newbies

    There is affiliate incest going on too (remember the big guru video explaining how to clear your cookies in great detail) why should I even bother trying to promote you with that kind of #$%& going on

    Lastly but not leastly, (made that last word up), YOU DON”T NEED HALF THIS CRAP!

    P.S. What ever happened to building “quality websites?”

  • http://www.sitefling.com/ Justin Brooke

    @James Schramko – We’re discussing ways to improve whats currently happening. The whole bonus war is scenario is a becoming a big issue. For exactly the reason Anna brings up from my post…. Why not just sell my bonus that I was going to offer for your product and then I don’t have to share my buyers with you.

    It’s easy to say “toughen up and offer a better bonus, it’s all part of the game” but that’s really just sweeping the problem under the rug. Eventually other product owners will change their ways and anyone who hasn’t will slowly start to lose partners.

    and if all affiliates changed their model to just being product owners, selling their own products… we as product owners would lose all our affiliates. Sure we’re smart enough to drive our own traffic but I’d sure like to keep the leveraging power of having affiliates drive all my traffic.

  • http://www.sitefling.com Justin Brooke

    @James Schramko – We’re discussing ways to improve whats currently happening. The whole bonus war is scenario is a becoming a big issue. For exactly the reason Anna brings up from my post…. Why not just sell my bonus that I was going to offer for your product and then I don’t have to share my buyers with you.

    It’s easy to say “toughen up and offer a better bonus, it’s all part of the game” but that’s really just sweeping the problem under the rug. Eventually other product owners will change their ways and anyone who hasn’t will slowly start to lose partners.

    and if all affiliates changed their model to just being product owners, selling their own products… we as product owners would lose all our affiliates. Sure we’re smart enough to drive our own traffic but I’d sure like to keep the leveraging power of having affiliates drive all my traffic.

  • http://twitter.com/GoAskLesley GoAskLesley

    Lazy Launch Days Are Numbered.. http://bit.ly/4ljG5
    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • http://twitter.com/GoAskLesley GoAskLesley

    Lazy Launch Days Are Numbered.. http://bit.ly/4ljG5
    This comment was originally posted on Twitter

  • Pingback: 6 Ways For Product Owners To Keep Affiliates Happy | Kikabink News - Internet Marketing News

  • http://CommonSenseLiving.com/ Carole

    Excuse me?

    People become affiliate marketers because they don't want to spend the time to research and develop a product, or handle delivery, customer service, refunds and such. And on top of that – products owners are supposed to provide a website that converts, and any and all promotional tools, articles, ebooks, videos, so all they have to do is send an email and split the money? Oh no, even that's not good enough – they should get 75% or more? Only in IM…

    Does anyone else see a problem with this?

  • http://CommonSenseLiving.com/ Carole

    Excuse me?

    People become affiliate marketers because they don't want to spend the time to research and develop a product, or handle delivery, customer service, refunds and such. And on top of that – products owners are supposed to provide a website that converts, and any and all promotional tools, articles, ebooks, videos, so all they have to do is send an email and split the money? Oh no, even that's not good enough – they should get 75% or more? Only in IM…

    Does anyone else see a problem with this?

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